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Bit Torrent

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Bit Torrent

Postby venney » Fri Sep 24, 2004 7:41 pm

What is BitTorrent?


What is BitTorrent?
BitTorrent is a protocol designed for transferring files. It is peer-to-peer in nature, as users connect to each other directly to send and receive portions of the file. However, there is a central server (called a tracker) which coordinates the action of all such peers. The tracker only manages connections, it does not have any knowledge of the contents of the files being distributed, and therefore a large number of users can be supported with relatively limited tracker bandwidth. The key philosophy of BitTorrent is that users should upload (transmit outbound) at the same time they are downloading (receiving inbound.) In this manner, network bandwidth is utilized as efficiently as possible. BitTorrent is designed to work better as the number of people interested in a certain file increases, in contrast to other file transfer protocols.



How does BitTorrent compare to other forms of file transfer?

The most common method by which files are transferred on the Internet is the client-server model. A central server sends the entire file to each client that requests it -- this is how both http and ftp work. The clients only speak to the server, and never to each other. The main advantages of this method are that it's simple to set up, and the files are usually always available since the servers tend to be dedicated to the task of serving, and are always on and connected to the Internet. However, this model has a significant problem with files that are large or very popular, or both. Namely, it takes a great deal of bandwidth and server resources to distribute such a file, since the server must transmit the entire file to each client. Perhaps you may have tried to download a demo of a new game just released, or CD images of a new Linux distribution, and found that all the servers report "too many users," or there is a long queue that you have to wait through. The concept of mirrors partially addresses this shortcoming by distributing the load across multiple servers. But it requires a lot of coordination and effort to set up an efficient network of mirrors, and it's usually only feasible for the busiest of sites.

Another method of transferring files has become popular recently: the peer-to-peer network, systems such as Kazaa, eDonkey, Gnutella, Direct Connect, etc. In most of these networks, ordinary Internet users trade files by directly connecting one-to-one. The advantage here is that files can be shared without having access to a proper server, and because of this there is little accountability for the contents of the files. Hence, these networks tend to be very popular for illicit files such as music, movies, pirated software, etc.


What clients are there?

I personally use Bit Tornado which i think is the best one i have used but here is other cleints

Microsoft Windows
The Shad0w's experimental client
burst!
burst plus!
SimpleBT
ABC ("Another BitTorrent Client")
Official client (NOT RECOMMENDED)
Eike Frost's Experimental client
Azureus
Shareaza
NovaTorrent
BitTorrent++

I've installed BitTorrent, now what?

There's no program to run!
BitTorrent is not like other peer-to-peer applications (such as Winmx, Kazaa, Gnutella, etc.) in that it does not have its own "universe." Put another way, BT lives on top of the Web, which means that all of the searching/listing of available files is done on the web. When you find a file you want to download, you click on it and the BitTorrent client program will run and ask you where to put it, and then start downloading. See the links section for some starting points on the web if you're new.


How do I uninstall BitTorrent?

Go to Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel. There should exist an entry for BitTorrent. If it's not there, suspect an incorrect install. You can always reinstall the latest version and then uninstall it.

If you know what you are doing, you can manually remove BitTorrent by deleting the directory C:\Program Files\BitTorrent\ (substituting the actual location of your Program Files dir) and removing the following registry keys:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.torrent
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\MIME\Database\Content Type\application/x-bittorrent
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\bittorrent
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\BitTorrent

thats for ms windows.

What do all these words mean? (seeding, uploading, share rating, etc.)
Here is a brief list of words associated with BitTorrent and their meanings


torrent
Usually this refers to the small metadata file you receive from the web server (the one that ends in .torrent.) Metadata here means that the file contains information about the data you want to download, not the data itself. This is what is sent to your computer when you click on a download link on a website. You can also save the torrent file to your local system, and then click on it to open the BitTorrent download. This is useful if you want to be able to re-open the torrent later on without having to find the link again.
In some uses, it can also refer to everything associated with a certain file available with BitTorrent. For example, someone might say "I downloaded that torrent" or "that server has a lot of good torrents", meaning there are lots of good files available via BitTorrent on that server.
peer
A peer is another computer on the internet that you connect to and transfer data. Generally a peer does not have the complete file, otherwise it would be called a seed. Some people also refer to peers as leeches, to distinguish them from those generous folks who have completed their download and continue to leave the client running and act as a seed.
seed
A computer that has a complete copy of a certain torrent. Once your client finishes downloading, it will remain open until you click the Finish button (or otherwise close it.) This is known as being a seed or seeding. You can also start a BT client with a complete file, and once BT has checked the file it will connect and seed the file to others. Generally, it's considered good manners to continue seeding a file after you have finished downloading, to help out others. Also, when a new torrent is posted to a tracker, someone must seed it in order for it to be available to others. Remember, the tracker doesn't know anything of the actual contents of a file, so it's important to follow through and seed a file if you upload the torrent to a tracker.
reseed
When there are zero seeds for a given torrent (and not enough peers to have a distributed copy), then eventually all the peers will get stuck with an incomplete file, since no one in the swarm has the missing pieces. When this happens, someone with a complete file (a seed) must connect to the swarm so that those missing pieces can be transferred. This is called reseeding. Usually a request for a reseed comes with an implicit promise that the requester will leave his or her client open for some time period after finishing (to add longevity to the torrent) in return for the kind soul reseeding the file.
swarm
The group of machines that are collectively connected for a particular file. For example, if you start a BitTorrent client and it tells you that you're connected to 10 peers and 3 seeds, then the swarm consists of you and those 13 other people.
tracker
A server on the Internet that acts to coordinate the action of BitTorrent clients. When you open a torrent, your machine contacts the tracker and asks for a list of peers to contact. Periodically throughout the transfer, your machine will check in with the tracker, telling it how much you've downloaded and uploaded, how much you have left before finishing, and the state you're in (starting, finished download, stopping.) If a tracker is down and you try to open a torrent, you will be unable to connect. If a tracker goes down during a torrent (i.e., you have already connected at some point and are already talking to peers), you will be able to continue transferring with those peers, but no new peers will be able to contact you. Often tracker errors are temporary, so the best thing to do is just wait and leave the client open to continue trying.
downloading
Receiving data FROM another computer.
uploading
Sending data TO another computer.
share rating
If you are using the experimental client with the stats-patch, you will see a share rating displayed on the GUI panel. This is simply the ratio of your amount uploaded divided by your amount downloaded. The amounts used are for the current session only, not over the history of the file. If you achieve a share ratio of 1.0, that would mean you've uploaded as much as you've downloaded. The higher the number, the more you have contributed. If you see a share ratio of "oo", this means infinity, which will happen if you open a BT client with a complete file (i.e., you seed the file.) In this case you download nothing since you have the full file, and so anything you send will cause the ratio to reach infinity. Note: The share rating is just a number that is displayed for your convenience. It does not directly affect any aspect of the client at all. In general, out of courtesy to others you should strive to keep this ratio as high as possible, of course.

To let bit torrent through your windows xp

Windows XP firewall:

Open the 'Network Connections' folder (click Start, then Control Panel, then Network and Internet Connections, then Network Connections.)
Click the shared connection or the Internet connection that is protected by Internet Connection Firewall, and then, under Tasks, click Change settings of this connection.
On the Advanced tab, click Settings.
For each port you wish to forward, (i.e. 6881, 6882, ... 6889) do the following:


On the Services tab, click Add and enter all of the following information:
In Description of service, type an easily recognized name for the service, such as "BitTorrent".
In Name or IP address of the computer hosting this service on your network, enter 127.0.0.1 (this means "the local machine.")
In both External and Internal port number for this service, enter the port number, e.g. 6881.
Select TCP, then OK.

What happens if I cancel a download? How can I resume?

BitTorrent fully supports stopping and later resuming a partial download. You don't have to do anything special. If you cancel a download before it's finished, the partial download remains on your hard drive. To resume the transfer, just click on the same torrent link again and when asked where to save the file, select the same location as last time. BitTorrent will see that the file exists and check it to see how much has already been downloaded. It will then pick up where it left off the last time. See also the section regarding file size.

Note: To resume properly, you must make the same selection when prompted as you made the first time. For torrents consisting of a single file, this is rather straight-forward: simply select the file. However, torrents that consist of a folder of multiple files can be a bit more confusing. To resume, you must select the folder that contains the BitTorrent folder.

Here's an example of resuming a folder-type torrent

Let's suppose that you downloaded a torrent called SomeCoolBand, and selected to put it in the folder Downloads. So your directory structure resembles something like \Downloads\SomeCoolBand\file1, \Downloads\SomeCoolBand\file2, and so on. The important part of this example is that should you resume this transfer, when asked to select a destination folder you must select the \Downloads folder and NOT \Downloads\SomeCoolBand. It may seem a bit counter-intuitive, but just remember to always make the same selection as the original choice. When you first started the transfer there was no SomeCoolBand folder; you instead selected \Downloads and BT created the SomeCoolBand folder


I just downloaded a file ending in .xyz, how do I open it?

Below is a list of common file types you will encounter with BitTorrent, and how to handle them.

.R00, .R01, .Rnn If you find a directory with a bunch of files ending in .Rnn, it's a RAR archive split into multiple parts. This is commonly done for posting to Usenet newsgroups. Open the .RAR file and extract the contents with WinRAR (Windows) or UnRarX (OS X.) Either program should automatically see all the parts if they are in the same directory.
.CBR, .CBZ These are comics in a compressed archive. For Windows, download the free program CDisplay. Or simply rename them (CBR to RAR, CBZ to ZIP) and open with your usual archive program, such as WinRAR or WinZIP. For OS X, try Book Image Viewer after extracting with unrar or unzip.
.PAR, .P01, .Pnn These are parity files, used to reconstruct any missing parts of the archive. Ordinarily you will not have to do anything with them -- they are extraneous unless a part is missing or bad, in which case the torrent's creator should have fixed the archive before distributing the torrent. If WinRAR does give you a message about a missing or corrupt part, then get SmartPAR (Windows) and open the .PAR file. The program will then check all the files and recreate any missing or damaged parts. For OS X, UnRarX should also process the PAR file.
.NFO Files that end in .NFO are plain text files that often contain very useful information about the files you have just downloaded. Always read the NFO file if you are having a problem! Unfortunately, the .NFO extention also has another meaning to Windows, so sometimes when you try to open these files you will get an error from MS System Information about a corrupt file. If this is the case you will also probably see the file listed with a type of "MSInfo File" or something similar. You should open the NFO file in Notepad, or any plain-text editor. More info here.
.SFV Simple File Verification file - used to verify the integrity of a set of files, this is a text file containing file names and typically CRC32 checksums. For Windows, try a program such as QuickSFV or fsum to verify the integrity. Mac OS X users should try MacSFV. Normally these files should not be necessary with BitTorrent, since the BT protocol has its own error checking method (on top of TCP's checksumming.) If you find some file that doesn't match the checksum in its SFV file, blame the torrent's creator, since he or she should have fixed it before creating and distributing the torrent.
.BIN, .CUE, .ISO These are images of a CD. If the file is a movie, they are most likely VCDs or SVCDs. There are several ways to deal with these. For Windows:

Use a program such as Nero to burn the images to a CDR and then view them in your standalone DVD player, or your DVD drive with your DVD player software. Some instructions for burning BIN files with common software applications can be found at this link.
If you know it's a VCD/SVCD, you can use a tool such as VCDGear to extract the MPEG data. VCDs will be MPEG-1 type files, and SVCDs will be MPEG-2 type files. Usually the easiest way to view these is with a DVD player such as PowerDVD which can read input from a file.
Use a program such as Daemon Tools or Alcohol 120% to 'mount' the file as a virtual disk. Then you can use PowerDVD or whatever application is appropriate to view the data from that drive.
For OS X:

Use FireStarter FX to burn (S)VCDs from CUE or BIN files.
Play (S)VCD files, and most others, with VLC.



I hope this little guide helps all who need it, obv i diddnt write it all i got bits from differnt websites and such

Venney
:)

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Sting like a bee.
Your hands can't hit
what your eyes can't see."
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Postby lilpinkflower » Fri Sep 24, 2004 10:14 pm

... and here's the link if anyone wants to download !!!!!

BitTorrent

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Postby venney » Sat Sep 25, 2004 12:32 am

sorry also,
http://www.suprnova.org/ for downloading torrents or http://isohunt.com/

both good sites
Venney
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Sting like a bee.
Your hands can't hit
what your eyes can't see."
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Postby mumblemass » Fri May 18, 2007 11:03 am

I use a handy little program called torrent harvester, you simply type in the name of the file you require and it scans all the well known torrent sites. there is the quality option to click the seed row in the table and it will place the highest seeded file at the top of the page

this can be found here
www.softpedia.com/progDownload/Torrent- ... 34987.html
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